Corn

We offer certified organic corn seed for varieties of sweet corn, popcorn, and ornamental and milling corn. An important crop for the early civilizations in the Americas, corn dates back almost 7,000 years. Corn can be eaten fresh as a vegetable or milled as a grain.

Items: 19 of 30, per page
  • Vigorous 6' plants produce 8" ears. Kernels will turn jet black when mature. Makes an excellent blue cornmeal. 70-90 days.

    • Plants grow to 6 feet
    • White kernels turn to black when mature
    • Ears grow to 8 inches
    • Produces blue cornmeal
    • 70-90 days
    • Packet 50 Seeds
    • $3.25
  • Non-GMO - Bloody Butcher corn has been grown in Virginia since 1845. Stalks grow up to 12 feet tall with two ears 8 to 12 inches long. Beautiful maroon and red-black kernels. Used for flour, cornmeal. Can be eaten as corn on the cob during the milk stage. Drought tolerant. Matures in 100-110 days.

    • $6.00
  • One of the only sweet corns that can be grown in containers, the 3-foot-tall plants of this variety bear 3-6 ears. Peak time for eating is when kernels are just turning blue, but can be eaten when white or steel blue. 70-80 days. ±185 seeds/oz

    • Organic
    • Sweet corn
    • Plants grow up to 3 feet
    • 3-6 ears per stalk
    • White kernels mature to steel blue color
    • Can be grown in containers
    • 70-80 days
    • ±185 seeds/oz
    • Packet 50 Seeds
    • $3.25
  • Earth Tones dent corn produces pastel colored ears of corn on tall stalks. The ears are highly decorative and the kernels make good corn flour.

    • $6.00
  • Unique variety developed by Carl Barnes and more recently stewarded by Carl’s protege, Greg Schoen. A wide range of jewel-tone colored kernels makes each ear uncommonly beautiful. Use for crafts, ornamental decoration, grind into cornmeal, or pop and enjoy. 1-2 ears per stalk, each 6-8" on plants 8-10' tall. Late maturing 110 days.

    • Organic
    • Flint/Popcorn
    • 1-2 ears per stalk, each 6-8" long
    • Plants 8-10' tall
    • 110 days
    • Packet 50 Seeds
    • $3.25
  • Non-GMO - From Southern Mexico where the native Zapetecs have been growing this dent corn for hundreds of years. The corn stocks grow to about 7' tall with ears of corn between 6 and 10 inches long. The kernels are green in color and is used for corn flour, often used in tamales and tortillas. Historically grown in the three-sisters style with a legume and squash.

    • $6.00
  • Colorful Montana mountain corn for milling flour. Selected by Dave Christensen from a strain of Mandan Indian corn for earliness and cold-hardiness. Multi-color kernels vary from ear to ear. Perfect for flour thanks to its soft starchy kernels that are easy to grind.

    • Multi-color
    • Ornamental/Milling
    • 6-7" ears
    • 90 Days Dry
    • Packet 1 Ounce
    • $5.00
  • Beautiful gold and maroon ears excellent for cornmeal, flour and hominy. This excellent Vermont flint corn was recognized by the Slow Food Ark of Taste as an historic variety in need of preservation. Highly ornamental and genetically unusual blend of colors. Seed royalties are paid to the Indigenous Seed Keepers Network in acknowledgement of the historic breeding work done by the Abenaki people of the Northeast and Quebec.

    • Gold/Red
    • Ornamental/Milling
    • 9-12" ears
    • 90-95 Days
    • Packet 1 Ounce
    • $5.00
  • Squanto was a Wampanoag that taught the early settlers of Jamestown how to garden in the New World. The three sisters gardening style allowed a family to survive on one acre of land. This seed package contains enough seed to plant one Wampanoag style garden with the following varities:

    • Waltham Butternut Winter Squash was an AAS winner in 1970. It's yellow-orange flesh has a delicious nutty flavor. The vining plant produces high yields of straight necked squash that are ready for harvest in 83 to 100 days. Store in a cool location and this squash will keep until spring.
    • Rattlesnake pole bean can be used as a fresh green bean when young or as a shelling bean when fully mature. Rattlesnake beans are rich in protein, fiber, folates, and vitamins A and B. Additionally they contain some iron, zinc, magnesium, calcium, copper and potassium.  They are believed to be native to the southwest region of North America where they were grown in ancient times by the Hopi Native Americans. They should be trellised as vines can reach up to ten feet in height and thrive in hot and humid climates and are prolific producers.
    • Oaxacan Green Dent Corn is from Southern Mexico where the native Zapetecs have been growing this dent corn for hundreds of years. The corn stocks grow to about 7 tall; tall with ears of corn between 6 and 10 long. The kernels are green in color and is used for corn flour, often used in tamales and tortillas.
    • Planting instuctions are provided.
    • $12.95
Items: 19 of 30, per page
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