Squash

Items: 17 of 7, per page
  • Acorn squash is indigenous to North and Central America. It is also known as Pepper Squash or Des Moines squash. It has distinctive longitudinal ridges and sweet, yellow-orange flesh. The rind is dark green often with splotches or orange. Stores well for winter in a cool dark room for up to six months. The weights about 2-3 pounds when mature and is about seven inches in diameter.

    • $4.00
  • Burgess Buttercup squash has a very fine grained bleach that cooks dry and sweet.

    • $4.00
  • Hubbard Blue Squash is an excellent keeper lasting up to 5 months in a cool basement or closet. The sweet orange flesh is great for pies or baked and served in slices.

    • $4.00
  • Japanese Red Kuri Squash is very popular with chefs as it sweet nutty flavor goes very well in risotto, soups, lasagna and even desserts. The average weight of the squash is 5-8 pounds, is teardrop shaped and is bright red.

    • $4.00
  • Spaghetti squash when baked or boiled is served like spaghetti. The skin matures from an ivory color to a pale yellow. Oblong fruit averages between 3 and 5 pounds with about 4 to 5 per plant. My favorite way to prepare the squash is to split it in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Brush the cut edges with olive oil and salt and pepper. Place cut edges on cookie sheet or large cast iron skillet and bake for 30 minutes in a 400 degree oven. Let cool a little bit so you can handle the squash, scooping out the stands of the squash in to a bowl. Top with your favorite spaghetti sauce.

    • $4.00
  • The Waltham Butternut Winter Squash was an AAS winner in 1970. It's yellow-orange flesh has a delicious nutty flavor. The vining plant produces high yields of straight necked squash that are ready for harvest in 83 to 100 days. Store in a cool location and this squash will keep until spring. I grow this squash in my corn field to keep the weeds down using the three sisters method. 20 Seeds

    • $4.00
  • Squanto was a Wampanoag that taught the early settlers of Jamestown how to garden in the New World. The three sisters gardening style allowed a family to survive on one acre of land. This seed package contains enough seed to plant one Wampanoag style garden with the following varities:

    • Waltham Butternut Winter Squash was an AAS winner in 1970. It's yellow-orange flesh has a delicious nutty flavor. The vining plant produces high yields of straight necked squash that are ready for harvest in 83 to 100 days. Store in a cool location and this squash will keep until spring.
    • Rattlesnake pole bean can be used as a fresh green bean when young or as a shelling bean when fully mature. Rattlesnake beans are rich in protein, fiber, folates, and vitamins A and B. Additionally they contain some iron, zinc, magnesium, calcium, copper and potassium.  They are believed to be native to the southwest region of North America where they were grown in ancient times by the Hopi Native Americans. They should be trellised as vines can reach up to ten feet in height and thrive in hot and humid climates and are prolific producers.
    • Oaxacan Green Dent Corn is from Southern Mexico where the native Zapetecs have been growing this dent corn for hundreds of years. The corn stocks grow to about 7 tall; tall with ears of corn between 6 and 10 long. The kernels are green in color and is used for corn flour, often used in tamales and tortillas.
    • Planting instuctions are provided.
    • $12.95
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